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The Grand Trunk In Brockville

On October 15, 1855, the Grand Trunk Railway opened its line from Montreal to Brockville.  At this time, Brockville was a thriving industrial town with major manufacturing facilities.  Being 125 miles from Point St Charles in Montreal, it was only natural for Brockville to be chosen as a divisional point on the Grand Trunk.  Concurrent with the opening of the Grand Trunk, the Brockville & Ottawa Railway opened its line between Brockville, Smiths Falls, Carleton Place and Almonte.  These thriving towns would provide freight traffic for the Grand Trunk.  
This photo of the turntable looking east shows the importance of Brockville during the days of steam.  There are 11 Grand Trunk locomotives around the turntable pit
Just beyond the steam locomotives is the incline which runs north to south to the northern tunnel entrance built by the Brockville & Ottawa in 1860.  At this point in time, the B&O is owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway.  

This is a photo of the same scene above only taken a few hundred feet further back.  In the midle of the photo is the ash pit with a gondola car half filled with ashes dumped from the steam locomotives.  On the right are three gondola cars loaded with ashes.  These will be used as ballast on some of the branch lines.   

This photo, taken some time in the late 1940s, early 1950s shows a much smaller locomotive servicing yard.  Note how the number of tracks around the turntable have been drastically reduced.  The incline leading to the CPR tunnel under Brockville can be clearly seen at the bottom right of the photo.  In the midle right of the photo, you can see the CPR line coming in on a curve from Smiths Falls and going in behin the CNR station near the top left of the photo. Curving off from the top middle of the photo and going behind the CNR station is the CPR loop line which follows Buell's Creek down to the Brockville waterfront.  

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