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Locating the Holes for the T-Nuts
We're going to locate 3 sets of holes for the T-nuts:
  • 4 T-nut holes to fasten the legs to our module.
  • 2 T-nut holes and 2 alignment pin holes in the end pieces (optional).  This will allow us to quickly align another set of modules at either end.
  • 4 T-nut holes which will allow us "bolt" carry plates to each end of two modules.  This will allow us to transport two modules together as one boxed set (optional).  If you belong to a module railroad club, you can easily join two modules together with a rectangular piece of ¼" plywood into a "boxed set" for transporting the modules to your meets. 

1. Locate the Holes for the Leg T-Nuts
Select one of the End Cross Members.  From one corner measure in 1¾" and mark an X as shown in the photo below.  From the other corner, measure in 1¾" and mark an X.  Mark this side as "Top"  and the edge that is 1¾" as "In"

Repeat the process for the other End Cross Member.

2. Locate the Holes for the Alignment Pins
If you make more than one module with trackwork that crosses from one module to another, it's handy to use "alignment pins" to align the two modules together.  This is simply a bolt with the head cut off, the "bullet" end filed a bit round and the threaded end screwed into the alignment pin T-nuts of one module.  The "bullet" end simply is inserted into a hole drilled in the end-plate of the other module.  The modules are held together with 2 C-clamps.  When you are constructing the trackwork going from one module to the other, you would clamp the two modules together (alignment pins in), and lay your track.  You may be tempted simply to cut the rail between the modules.  Don't!!!  Use a short piece of snap track (3" or longer) so that it straddles the two modules.  Rail joiners hold the snap track in place when you are set up.  When you take the modules down, you simply slide off the rail joiners, remove the snap track, and dismantle. 

This is what an alignment pin looks like.  We'll show you how to make them later. 


Select one of the End Plates.  Turn the End Plate over so that the side marked "In" is facing you (This is the side that does not have the countersunk screw holes).  Measure 5¼" from each end of the End Plate and 2¾" from the top of the End Plate.  Mark an X at each end as shown in the photo below.  (Double check these measurements again as the location of these holes is very critical. 
(Your club may have standards regarding the location of alignment pins or you may have other modules with alignment pins in different locations.  Locate your alignment pins accordingly.) 


Repeat the above steps for the other End Plate. 
You will have two X's that are 12" apart and are 6" from the centre of the End Plate (the centre is at 11¼" from either end). 


3. Locate the Holes for the Carrying Plates
If you belong to a modular railroad club, you usually have two sets of modules that mate together so you can transport them to your meets.  To protect the scenery and for ease of transportation, the modules are placed face-to-face and "mated" together with two ¼" rectangular plywood Carrying Plates to form what I call a "boxed set" (we'll show you how to make the plywood Carrying Plates later) .  These Carrying Plates are bolted to the end of each module as shown in the photos below using 2 T-nuts inserted into the End Plates of each module. 

Select one End Plate.  Turn the End Plate over so that the side marked "In" is facing you (This is the side that does not have the countersunk screw holes).  From the bottom corners of the End Plates measure in 1¾".  Mark an X at each end as shown in the photo below.  Double check these measurements again as the location of the holes is very critical. 
(Your club may have standards regarding the location of T-nuts for the Carrying Plates or you may have other modules with T-nuts for Carrying Plates pins in different locations.  Locate your alignment pins accordingly.) 


Now that we've got the holes for the T-nuts located, let's start drilling and installing the T-nuts.